Hardie Siding

Caulking your Hardie Siding

Caulking your hardie siding after it is installed is one of the most important parts of the installation process. Caulk will ensure that water will not penetrate between the seams of the hardy siding, or where the hardy siding butts up against your window and door trim. Caulking is a big part of correctly installing hardie board correctly.

It is now recommended that caulk be placed in the seams while you are installing it, not after. So what this means is that before you butt two pieces of hardy siding together, you need to apply a thick bead of caulk to the edge of the hardy pieces that will be touching. Apply the caulking and push the seams tight, allowing the caulk to seal the seam tightly. After the pieces of hardie board are installed, take a damp rag and wipe away access caulking.

What kind of caulking should I use on hardie plank siding? Many people wonder what the best, or more importantly the correct kind of caulking to use is. If you want your finished home siding to keep out wind driven rain, and snow, you need to use a caulking that will remain permanently flexible. If a caulk if made to stay flexible, it will say so right on the tube. Make sure to look for this when you buy caulking.

After you have caulked your hardie plank siding, it is important to allow the caulking to dry the recommended amount of time on the tube. Each manufacturer or brand of caulking is different, so make sure you read the directions. Why is it important to allow the caulk to dry first? This will help the caulking take paint better. If you paint caulk before it is completely dry, it will continue to shrink, causing your paint to crack and chip.

Another important tip about caulking your hardie plank siding, is to remember that anywhere your hardy siding butts up against a wood material, such as door and window trim, you need to leave a gap. This gap needs to be 1/8″ to allow the wood to swell and contract. This is one of the reasons you are using a permanently flexible caulking.

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Hardie Plank Siding

Hardie plank siding is becoming incresingly popular due to its ability to withstand wind, fire, hail, and rain for an extremely long time.  Hardie plank siding can last 50 years or more and look good doing it.  Hardie can take the place of brick, metal, wood, or vinyl siding.  It has become incresingly popular on the coast where houses are painted in pastel colors to give them a very island beachhardie2 style home.  Planks come in different lengths and heights.  James hardie now offers pre colored hardie planks, to elemenate the need to paint when finished installing.  All these plus’s and you will still find Hardie siding prices comparable to most any other form of exterior paneling or siding.  Hardie board Siding Prices will vary on the style and size that you buy of course, and even the Hardie trim peices are very comparable in price to treated lumber prices.   Hardie also comes in a shingle which can be used on the entire house to give it the old cedar plank look, or as a decorative design for certain parts of your house.

For applications calling for  vertical siding, you can also get a hardie designed for vertical installation.  Use this with hardie trim peices to give your house that board and batten look.  There are all different kinds of hardie plank siding to suit your needs, such as soffit panels, backer board, lap planks, and even artisan lap plank designs.

Hardie plank siding is impervious to water, which makes it the ultimate siding source.  It comes pre primed and ready to paint.  Hardie siding can become brittle when it is bent. Unlike wood it does not support its own weight very well.  It is important when istalling it that it has a sturdy flat structure to be nailed or screwed to.  The pros way out weigh the cons and would add a unique look to your home to last a life time.

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Best House Siding

Many people wonder what is the best house siding? There really is no true answer for the best house siding . There are so many to choose from and it really depends on you the homeowner as to which siding will best fit your house. Hardie board siding is so versatile because it comes in many shapes and textures. So for that reason many people do choose hardy siding as the best house siding.

Hardie board siding will last at least your lifetime on your home and could last for generations to come. Do not overlook wood siding though as it has been around since the beginning of houses, and is still going strong today. If you prefer a plank siding, you can get a plank siding in many different materials such as cement Board, or Hardie plank, different woods such as cedar, and pine among others. Aluminum siding and vinyl siding also last a long time as well however with aluminum siding to have to worry about corrosion, and with vinyl siding it becomes brittle over the years.

For the price that you’re going to pay for this investment, you want to choose a house siding that will last as long or longer than you’re going to own the home. Hardy plank siding takes paint so well and does not need to be primed which is another aspect that you should consider when looking for the best house siding. When calculating the cost of your siding make sure to include the price of good quality nails or screws, lots of caulking, paint, trim pieces, moisture barrier, and how much per square foot you are going to be charge for installation, unless you’re planning on doing the installation yourself.

Hardie Board Siding is just one of the many ways that you can cover the exterior of your home. Remember there are other alternatives such as brick, stone, stucco, and if you’re really creative you can go for the log cabin look and actually use real logs. Take your time and do your research I believe that with enough reading and research on the Internet you will come to a conclusion that Hardie plank siding may just be the best house siding for your money.

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Hardie in the Bathroom

The most commonly thought of way to use hardie board, is as a siding. However hardie has many other uses for its materials. When installing tile on a peer and beam home you would use an underlayment known as Hardie Backer. I have heard it called so many different terms, some of which are: Hardie Backer Board, Fiber cement, Fiber Cement Board, Hardie Fiber Cement Board and so on…. You can call it what you want, and you can just about spell it how you want. Hardi, Hardee, Hardy I think most people will know what you are talking about.

When using a hardie backer board to install tile over it is important to have a good foundation to go over. This usually means at least a 3/4 inch ply wood sub floor. One thing that you would not want to do when installing Hardie board as your subfloor is, to go directly over studs. Hardy board is not strong enough by itself to support that amount of weight.

When installing Hardie backer over an existing subfloor to install tile over, it is very important that you use a multipurpose thin set. It is very helpful to make your measurements for your cuts, then dry them,  If in fact they do fit than what you would want to do is use a 3/8 inch notched trowel, to spread down a layer of thin set. While the headset is wet place the Hardie backer into place, then using special Hardie backer screws, screw the Hardie backer to the sub floor placing screws every 8 inches. After the thin set dry’s underneath your Hardie backer, your floor will be solid as a rock.

Before installing your tile, you will need to float in tape your seams. A fiberglass mesh tape works well, along with then set as your float. After this dries you are ready to install your tile.

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Hardie as a Sub Floor

The most commonly thought of way to use hardie board, is as a siding. However hardie has many other uses for its materials. When installing tile on a peer and beam home you would use an underlayment known as Hardie Backer. I have heard it called so many different terms, some of which are: Hardie Backer Board, Fiber cement, Fiber Cement Board, Hardie Fiber Cement Board and so on…. You can call it what you want, and you can just about spell it how you want. Hardi, Hardee, Hardy I think most people will know what you are talking about.

When using a hardie backer board to install tile over it is important to have a good foundation to go over. This usually means at least a 3/4 inch ply wood sub floor. One thing that you would not want to do when installing a Hardie board as your subfloor is, to go directly over studs. Hardy board is not strong enough by itself to support that amount of weight. Remember that you will use a 1/4 inch Hardie board for the floor and 1/2 Hardie Board for the Walls.

When installing Hardie backer over an existing subfloor to install tile over, it is very important that you use a multipurpose thin set. It is very helpful to make your measurements for your cuts, then dry T If in fact they do fit than what you would want to do is use a 3/8 inch notched trowel, to spread down a layer of thin set. While the headset is wet place the Hardie backer into place, then using special Hardie backer screws, screw the Hardie backer to the sub floor placing screws every 8 inches. After the thin set dry’s underneath your Hardie backer, your floor will be solid as a rock.

Before installing your tile, you will need to float in tape your seams. A fiberglass mesh tape works well, along with then set as your float. After this dries you are ready to install your tile.

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